Central PA's LGBT News Source

the battle is underway

Will India reverse anti-gay law?

Posted 1/2/18

Salman Rushdie said in a recent interview with The Central Voice publisher and editor Frank Pizzoli:

In India, this terrible thing happened. Under a previous government [in 2009], homosexuality …

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the battle is underway

Will India reverse anti-gay law?

Posted

Salman Rushdie said in a recent interview with The Central Voice publisher and editor Frank Pizzoli:

"In India, this terrible thing happened. Under a previous government [in 2009], homosexuality was legalized, decriminalized. Many gay people came out and they lived normal lives at last. And now this new government came in, and the Indian high court has effectively recriminalized homosexuality [by not recognizing the 2009 decriminalization decision]. So that now homosexuality is, once again, illegal in India. Now all those people who came out are, in theory, at risk. That’s a very bad situation. Writers have had conversations about and have written about their own sexual orientation. Now they are now asking: can I expect a knock on the door because I am openly gay? I think it’s pretty difficult.

"Today, there is optimism in India that the law outlawing homosexuality may be overturned. The New Delhi Times reports that there is renewed optimism that a recent Supreme Court ruling has paved the way to overturn an archaic law that criminalizes gay sex.

"The battle to do away with the colonial era law has taken a tortuous route. Scrapped in 2009 by the Delhi High Court, it was reinstated in 2013 by the Supreme Court, dealing a massive blow to gay rights. At that time the top court said it was up to the legislature to change the law, but it has since agreed to review that ruling."